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Senior Games
Senior Games Publicity

Each year during the 2nd and 3rd weeks of October, the Huntsman World Senior Games (HWSG) are held in St. George, Utah. The games are the largest and most well organized annual senior games event in the world. More than 11,000 senior athletes (age 50+) from all 50 states in the U.S. and more than 30 countries come to compete in 30 different sporting and athletic events.

BYU students have a 26-year history of volunteering to conduct health screenings, including balance, blood pressure, body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, emotional health, functional strength, glaucoma, visual acuity, carotid artery ultrasound, hearing, and more. Students receive training for the various health screenings, and for the most part all expenses are covered. Dr. Ron Hager of Exercise Sciences has been organizing this volunteer experience for BYU students for 20 years!

In addition to the benefit of the volunteer experience, students can also receive internship credit for their major and/or for the Gerontology Minor internship requirement.

The 2019 Senior Games Health Screenings were offered October 9th-12th and 15th-17th. Volunteers can go one or both weeks and earn 1 internship credit for each week that they volunteer! Volunteers sign up by filling out this Google Form. For more information, please email hwsgbyu@gmail.com

“This has been one of the most incredible experiences of my time at BYU! It is hands on motivation that should give you a vision of what life can look like in old age. Wow.”
(Nathan T.)
“The athletes were funny and impressed me! Fun to be in such a beautiful place as St. George and be able to get internship experience at the same time.”
(Cory H.)
“This was a once in a lifetime opportunity! I met so many amazing people and really made an effort to get to know them. I want to try to volunteer at the games in the years to come! Definitely one of the best internships EVER!”
(Madisyn M.)
“I have attended the Senior Games two years in a row and have loved the experience. I have learned so much about health and the joy that good health can bring to an individual as they age. It has changed my perception about getting old and has served as a motivator to take care of my body while I am young. Every student should attend the Senior Games if they have a chance to. It will change their lives.”
(Oleg M.)
“It is one of the greatest mid-semester opportunities you could participate in! It's a great break from any monotony you're feeling with school to help you remember what you're learning and why you're learning it. You'll have chances to meet awesome people - seniors and students alike.”
(Meagan P.)
“This was an incredible experience to open your eyes to another side of getting older. You see the people who care about taking care of their bodies and you gain hope in having an independent and fulfilling life throughout your lifetime. Also I recommend doing the carotid artery ultrasound extra training. We as a team grew close and became good friends. These are friendships I will hold close for years to come.”
(Tyler B.)
“It's so cool to meet people who are so athletic and healthy for their age and competing in things most people their age can't do. They have such awesome life experiences to share too. I learned a lot in the screenings about my own health as I was trained to teach the athletes about their health. It was so fun and Dr. Hager and the others in charge are really great!”
(Julia H.)

DECEMBER 8, 2017 / GRACEAHAGGARD

The athletes’ muscles tense as their ears ring, waiting to hear the starting buzzer. In the instant the buzzer sounds, the athletes rush from the blocks and the fans let out a roar of cheering. Sitting in the stands, you may think that you’re at an Olympics qualifying event…until you realize that the athletes are all over the age of 50. The Huntsman World Senior Games, held annually in St. George, hosts about 11,000 athletes in events similar to those of the Rio Olympics. Our own Gerontology Department helps sponsor this event because it helps students gain significant, high-quality training and learning experience while representing BYU. At this past October’s games, there were 67 students from various majors across the BYU campus volunteering at the event, producing around 3,000 volunteer hours, and of these 67 students, 16 were studying something within the College of Family, Home and Social Sciences, and seven of those were Gerontology minors.

One of them, Oleg Mironchenko, shared that at the Senior Games he learned alot about the joy that good health can bring to an individual as they age. He said: “It has changed my perception about getting old and has served as a motivator to take care of my body while I am young.” His fellow volunteer and Gerontology minor Tyler Brown added that “this was an incredible experience to open your eyes to another side of getting older. You see the people who care about taking care of their bodies and you gain hope in having an independent and fulfilling life throughout your lifetime.”

As Gerontology students have learned, aging is a lot more than getting wrinkles and discounts at restaurants. It’s about taking care of your health and embracing every opportunity and especially every sporting event at the Senior Games. As said by Gerontology secretary Sarah Rogers, “seeing older adults play at such a competitive level reminded me how important it was to stay healthy and physically active throughout my life.”

Service and Education

Volunteering at the Games is a true combination of service and education. Students provide health screenings three full days during each of the two weeks of the Games. This year, an estimated 3,000 unique athletes went through at least several aspects of the health screenings. “In some cases these health screenings have had life-saving implications for the participants,” said Hager. “Every year we are…able to identify a few of the games participants who have no idea regarding life-threatening health risks they are experiencing…. We even have participants return the next year telling students that this station saved their life based on their previous years screening results and their follow-up with their regular doctors. That is pretty gratifying for me and even more so for the students.”

Regarding the educational value of the service for students, BYU Exercise Science professor Ron Hager, who has helped to ensure the quality of care, services, and screenings that volunteers provide for athletes since 1990 along side UVU nursing professor Gary Measom, says that part of his dedication for the Games is connected to the quality educational experience they provide for students. “For me, there are many facets to an education,” he said. “There is traditional in-class learning and instruction, but there is also the practical application of what is being learned, and even research opportunities,” shared Hager. “I feel like the students get great hands-on opportunities when they attend the games and many are involved in data collection for research projects at the undergraduate and graduate levels. For many students it is a complete paradigm shift in terms of what it means to get older as they interact with senior athletes who are committed to an active and healthy lifestyle into their later years.”

Impacting Athlete (and Student) Lives

The Games tend to become more than just excellent service and educational experience, though. Hager reports: “Nearly every student I talk to has said that the Games volunteer experience has been one of the best experiences they have had while at BYU… Students not only make lasting friendships with other BYU students and students from other universities, but also with the athletes.”